Autism (ASD) and Music–Insights and Lessons for All of Us

“Emmanuela reported feeling more confident about being part of the school band. She showed pride when she received her report card with a “B” in music.  Emmanuela for the first time in her life felt part of a group. She complained about other situation when she was not accepted, even during lunch break when students still move when she comes to their table. Emmanuela feThe Kolman Familyels like she belongs to the band, and even brags about being much better than other band members.”

– Grace Y. Kolman, M.A. in Counseling; Early Intervention Graduate Assistant, University Health Center’s Substance Abuse Prevention, James Madison University

 Teaching children and adolescents with ASD to play an instrument is a matter of inclusion more than performance. The ability to recognize emotion in music is preserved in their brain, and it would not be an issue.”  – Grace Y. Kolman

School counselors need to work close with music teachers to support them and the children during the learning process. Music is an open avenue to communication due to its universal language.”  – Grace Y. Kolman

” Be aware of ethnic and cultural differences is very important. Repertoire should be sensitive to these differences.” – Grace Y. Kolman

Quotes from Emmanuela:

“It is difficult to learn how to play, but you don’t give up.” 

“Mamma and Daddy, I got a B in the band, are you proud of me?” 

“You never give up” 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s